Sunday, September 30, 2012

Carlton J. Pegler Home




This was the home of Carlton J. Pegler, his wife Mabel, and their three sons.  Carlton, the son of John Carlton (J.C.) and Mary Pegler, came from England (via Iowa) with his family in 1880, when Carlton was about 7 years old.  He helped his father develop the orange groves on the family ranch, and also managed the Arbolita Ranch, a nearby orange grove owned by a Mr. Blair. 

In 1898 Carlton married Mabel Eva Robinson, originally from Massachusetts, and the daughter of William Robinson.  The Robinsons' house on Baldwin was the community's first post office, and Mabel was the city's first female postmistress.  According to census records, the couple had three children, all boys, named Harold, Ernest, and Donald.

The Peglers must have been a close-knit family.  Carlton and Mabel's home, originally a one-story house, was not far from Carlton's parents' home.  Once Carlton and Mabel had their own ranch, he continued to help his father with the family farm, while developing his own grove.  Additionally, by 1920, William Robinson had passed away, and Mabel's mother Sarah was living with the family.

In 1914, Carlton Pegler became the City Treasurer of Sierra Madre.  It appears that the Peglers may have moved from this house sometime between 1930 and 1935.  In 1950, when the Annals of Early Sierra Madre was published, Mr. Pegler still held the City Treasurer position. 

Carlton Pegler passed away in December of 1958, at 85 years old.  His wife, Mabel, passed away in August of 1964, at the age of 87.

8 comments:

  1. I wish I had more time to go through all the links. Love the history element your digging up. I too had a relative born in the 1890s who ended up in Sierra Madre via Iowa. She was kind of mean though.

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    1. No worries - these links just go back to other posts, and you've already read them! Thanks. I'm really loving the history stuff. I have had a subscription to Ancestry.com since forever, and just realized I can use it for this stuff. It only took me 6 months to clue in. Now you have me curious about who this relative was!!!

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  2. It is amazing the amount of history there is in Sierra Madre. Can you imagine how beautiful it must have been with all the orange groves and the smell in the spring! Wow!

    Marie

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    1. Well, this history is everywhere, isn't it? I'm just having so much fun finding ours. I'd never thought of all those orange blossoms at once. Must have been like heaven!

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  3. I've seen this house - love it. Thanks for the background.

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    1. Thanks, Ms. M! It's a good one. :)

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  4. Oh, so cool, all the various pieces of history stitched together through the links to your posts - it's kinda coming together (well, it'll take me a while, I'm a bit slow!:). This is a lovely house, to imagine these folks lived through the early days of the city, all the way to the Mad Men and psychedelic 60s era!

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    1. It's amazing how it's all coming together for me, too. I'm hoping I can continue to find good info like this. Of course, we'll have to intersperse it with some good old fun now and again. That's the beauty of the Daily Photo Blog - not too many rules! :)

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